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of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with these key challenges. what happens on january 1, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal s
is "education." which means it pays no taxes, and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests. i can go down there and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states, and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had them meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important issue in american life, from health and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec
. we're the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the work force, the 21st-century jobs. that is what we get from higher education to work force training, the real obstacle and the income growth right now is having the best education systems. where we are producing the workers of the 21st century. second, we keep the bridges open and hopefully functional and rebuilt. we represent environmental policies to keep our water clear and take on the environmental challenges that we're facing. it is where the rubber hits the road that we need to get the results. we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets understand that they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with a vision on education, on ensuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force for the jobs that aring with created, so we can be the job creators and we see incomes rise on our constituent. that is what voters judge you by. when we come out and talk to candidates we go for job creators, folks who are going to create jobs in this
like trying to improve the education system. the fund mental things are what we need to work on. not just that we are growing faster in 2013 but for many years thereafter. >> christine, you make the point all the time. first of all, education, the payback is good. when you look at the numbers and compare the average to those with college degree, it's half. the unemployment rate is half. >> i'm terrified about the kids who haven't had a chance to get in the labor market yet. they have a degree, student debt. they're not in the labor market yet. the first job you have. the first foot on. the first foot on the ladder is so important to lifetime achievement. it's a country eating your young. good education but there is an opportunity for the education once you get into the labor market. >> christine, diane, ken. thanks for joining us. good conversation about the jobs report. let's see what the future holds in terms of jobs. all right. does this man scare you? if you're a republican in congress the answer is probably yes. in the last three weeks, more lawmakers have said they are don
and sergei together based on their education at a higher level to create google in private industry, if you want to declare the garage as private industry. to me sitting here google is sort of the epitome of the way all those forces come together to create what i think of innovation now, and that is what larry page said when you first apply to google, one of the things you have to learn rightway is his line is, he wants you to have all the people at googling a healthy disregard for the impossible. and that is something particularly after coming out of government, i really took me a while to shift my brain to work that way. let me answer the question in two ways in terms of innovation and i do want to bring it back to what president faust was talking about. what concerns me so greatly when i am allowed to stand on the precipice of a company that is constantly creating and innovating because of this healthy disregard they have for the impossible, like google, when i'm working with entrepreneurs and venture capitalists who also invest in that notion of no guarantees, but a sterling ride, in wo
security, improving education, particularly k-12 education, which the american public in this poll said is fundamentally important for a competitive nation and for the success of our next generation. they want solutions. they're very hopeful, but they want solutions. they want leaders to compromise. in this poll, as in all, a majority of both parties said their leadership should compromise with the opposition even if it means they accept the policies they do not agree with and if that means some policies around which they decided to vote for the presidential candidate of their choice. consistent with what everything we have been hearing and reading, they do rank debt and the deficit very highly as a priority for elected officials to get done, to compromise, and get to work. they also made it very clear what they have made clear in every one of our previous 14 polls, and they want the debate be connected to their real life and to things they needed to survive in the economy. the kitchen table discussion is important to them, so those priorities are poured to their mind, and they want goo
education and for education. if government does that and create some certainty, tell us what it will be. with respect to health care costs and energy costs. and then i think it will create the conditions under which businesses will be able to create a renaissance of american competitors. i think that is a brilliant agenda. i think we have agreed that as the distinguished alumnus of harvard said washington as a town with northern charm and southern efficiency. let's assume we go through the fiscal cliff. immigration, corporate tax reform, and investments. emigration, you're not doing the dramatic. vietor due to comprehensive immigration but we did not have a chance to do it. both wings cayman decided it would sabotage it. maybe republicans learned the lesson but i am not sure how much of a lesson. the way that was financed was through the corporate tax increase but there -- that had people on both sides will in to work with the white house and congress. when you talk about infrastructure spending and investments in things we have done with nih, all the talk now is about death. >-- how do
for right now, and give our kids the kind of education they need to succeed in the 21st century. i want to make sure america leads the world in research and technology and clean energy. i want to put people back to work rebuilding our roads and our bridges and our schools. [applause] that's how we grow an economy. i want us to bring down our deficits, but i want to do it in a balanced, responsible way. and i want to reward -- i want a tax code that rewards businesses and manufacturers like detroit diesel right here, creating jobs right here in redford, right here in michigan, right here in the united states of america. [applause] that's where we need to go. that's the country we need to build. and when it comes to bringing manufacturing back to america -- that's why i'm here today. since 1938, detroit diesel has been turning out some of the best engines in the world. [applause] over all those years, generations of redford workers have walked through these doors. not just to punch a clock. not just to pick up a paycheck. not just to build an engine. but to build a middle-class life for t
on the really important things that make a difference from job creation. we are the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the workforce of 21st century jobs. that is what democratic governors get. the real obstacle to job growth is having the best education system, particularly in the s.t.e.m. sciences. we implement many of the environmental policies. where the rubber hits the road is that you have to get results. the reason we are winning races is that we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets and understand they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with an imaginative vision on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they hav
,000 a year. he has so far resisted gop demands for spending cuts to health care or education. >> i'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks and then we're asking students to pay higher student loans. >> reporter: even so, democrats worry mr. obama might cave to republicans, their biggest fear, the president will do what he considered in 2011, raise the eligibility age for medicare, a top house democrat monday warned the white house to tread lightly. >> now that would save a lot of money for the federal government and look good on the balance sheet but he's not going to vote for it and i'm not going to vote for it. >> reporter: this is a big part of the story to come. if there's a deal that's a huge break-through but lawmakers still have to vote for it and democrats oppose large structural cuts to medicare and most republicans oppose income tax rates on the so-called wealthy. that's why lawmakers were told not to make big fiscal travel plans because the crisis could go to new year's eve. >> political direc
with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain difference or a picture of a scan or whatever it is, you
're not jeopardizing our future by, you know, putting in dramatic cuts to education and health care and innovation. we've got to have balanced spending cuts. we have to make sure we bring savings out of entitlement programs like we did with the affordable care act. $716 billion in savinging out of medicare and added eight years of insolvency when we passed the affordable care act. president obama put $360 billion on n. savings on the table in his proposal to the republicans. so we've got it all on the table. the republicans have given us a letter with a, you know, sort of vague outline of five things that they want to consider. tax reform is important. that we have to do over the long term next year. hopefully we can try to get some agreement quickly. but the bottom line is that democrats have put a whole bunch of things that we're willing to agree to on the table and the republicans need to show their cards and stop playing chicken with our economy. >> congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz, thank you. >>> and -- >> thank you. >> matt and liz, she makes the point about republicans and whether the con
for us. if you will do something on stem education, qualified members help us identify companies from understanding of their home markets. we work with local chambers, members of congress, and we have developed a network of convenience, local business leaders better interested in participating and know how to recruit people. so far we are brought more than two thousand people to the white house this year alone representing more than 500 towns and cities, probably around 1800 companies. out of 10 our ceo's. two out of 10 are investors. host: scott. georgia. republican. caller: i may health insurance broker and i have a couple of the employees and a comment on the aca. i agree and something had to be done on health care costs, but this will just add fuel to the fire. part of the provisions that have yet to come into effect, one of which requires the highest ratio from three-to-one, that is your lowest rate cannot be any higher than three times your lowest rate. so, if you have a 64-year-old and a 19-year-old, you can not charge the real cost because the risk factors for a 19-year-old ar
not subtraction. we did a very bad job with outreach with people of color, we alienated college educated women, the gay vote and the hispanic vote. if the republicans are serious about growing as a party and about moving forward not only for 2014 but the presidential election, we need to grow and expand our base and we didn't do it this time. >> when the election was in process, why were you not standing up and condemning publicly some of the things that were repeatedly being said that were mildly racist, deliberately sexist, often divisive of people. why didn't you stand up and -- >> quite to the contrary. i have been very, very difficulty ebt db. >> you have been on the show regularly -- >> i have been on other networks and shows. >> we're not interested in those. >> of course not. >> sorry. >> but i've been very consistent about saying the republicans have done a terrible job about african-american outreach. it's just disgraceful. haven't done it. i have consistently gone on the sar and said when are we going to realize and say folks of people are going to want to vote for president obama f
, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> we have been telling you about these two unlikely but powerful men who have teamed up to fight for same sex marriage in california. they say it is not a matter of being republican or democrat, and same sex marriage is simply an issue of civil rights. cnn's gloria borger tells us how the story of this political odd couple began. >> we now need to resolve this election. >> reporter: it was the historic case that decided the presidency and divided the nation. olson and boyce were the ones on the steps of the supreme court battling it out. that was then. this is now. on the streets of new york, they're talking anything but the law. >> it is called crazy heart, jeff bridges. >> i know, i know. i haven't seen that. i want to see that, though, and avatar. >> reporter: yethey have come a long way. let me play a game with you. great lawyer. >> ted. >> david. >> reporter: that's too
, educational music and videos. everything they want. >> would you let your 5-year-old use this? >> if it's educational stuff. >> this is fun and education. amazon, walmart and target. >> for kids older and the entire family, we have the curio 7. this is a real android device. 4.0. for me, i can put anything on here, but i can also put profiles up here, up to eight. i can determine what sites my kids go to, what apps they go to and how long they stay on and control all of that right here. you will find this at best buy, toys "r" us and target.com. >> this is old school. >> the next level with that cardboard box. this is the discovery kids color and play steam engine. it's recycled cardboard, eco friendly. you'll find this at kohls in-store only. >> you guys are doing a great job. thanks for everything. >> coming up, we'll get that $12 bottle of wine. >> first, these messages. gecko (clearing throat) thank you, mr. speaker, uh, members of congress. in celebration of over 75 years of our government employees insurance company, or geico...as most of you know members it.congress. ...i propose
to do effective voter education and so until we address that, that systemic issue, they can you're going to continue to see things over and over again. you know, if you want to -- something that is a little bit kind of absurd situation, in galveston, texas, there were 39 polling places that opened in the afternoon because they didn't give enough time to turn the machines on and let them warm up and the judge had to extend polling place hours. so simple things that impact voters in an area. that was something that was surprising to us. or the high number of provisional ballots where they didn't have the right registration information. then you had, especially in predominantly african-american precincts, voters who were showg up and they were given provisional ballots. and there were so many provisional ballots, there were some voter had to walk away. and that shouldn't happen in this country. >> a great example. >> we had a great voter protection team headed by bill bauer and court in the, and we had a good system to track. so just break down what we saw on election day. 32% of the issues
of an outstanding democrat on the subcommittee on work force protection of the education and labor committee and that is congresswoman lynn woolsey. congresswoman woolsey knows their struggles. four decades ago she was a single working mother supporting three children. she knows about the economic security of families. later as a resource manager she knew things like working families are still fighting for like paid leave, paid sick leave, retirement and health care. serving as chair and ranking member of the work force protection subcommittee, lynn woolsey was instrumental in helping to get the lilly ledbetter fair pay act signed into law and military families dealing with military deployment and injury. lynn woolsey was a partner to ensure coal miners are kept safe and healthy on the job. she went underground in a coal mine with our late colleague donald payne to require firsthand knowledge of how the workplace works and the environment in which those miners go to work every day. in the classroom, lynn woolsey continues to fight for women and working families. she was -- i want to say hars
york and across the country. is the attitude about urban education and how many kids we are losing their are not graduating from schools. basically saying, we have an issue here we have to deal with. i try to discuss that with other mayors across the state and with the decision makers. we have to come up with solutions. it is a burden for a lot of cities, not just school taxes but property taxes and trying to balance the budget to provide the services needed. this are two major problems. this is a very old city. we have a lot of beautiful historic buildings. and in many ways when people do not take care of them, it is hard to keep them on the tax rolls or make sure people invest in them. basically, i have been through five governors in my 19 years as the mayor. i deal directly with the governors and the people in the senate and the assembly. we talk about the state capital which was tax -- 74% tax exempt. a lot of it was a result of the state taking over a large percentage of our city. a lot of it was non for profits. i have had a good working relationship with people in the state
nation's capitol. and we are bought to you this morning by the national education association, good men and women of the nea under president dennis van rockier creating great public school for every student in america. filed out more on their website at nea.org. mitt romney spending millions and millions and millions more dollars on staff rewarding his staff than president obama did. thought this guy was supposed to be so good at balancing his budget. we will tell you about that in just a second. but first, at this difficult time -- happy time of the year actually but tough for some people because it's tough to meet the demands of the holiday season. looking to make some extra money each month. here is something you might want to take a look at incomeathome.com, america's leading work-from-home business giving you an opportunity to take advantage of no matter your aiming, education or experience. you can literally own money on your own computer from your own kitchentable 24/7. all you need is a little bit spare time and the training you will get from inco
, education, voter suppression, what the leadership has done is, say on immigration, we want deportation. when it talks about education, it's talking about not funding it anymore. when they talk about voter suppression, they deny people the right to vote -- >> but you grew up in this party. it has been a party tough on immigration before, hasn't it? hasn't it been a tough party on a number of issues you've mentioned before? >> there's no question about that. >> when do you think the republican parties broke bad? when did it start to be a part that you couldn't be a member of anymore? >> i think it started several years ago. maybe two, three years ago. i mean, i left the party two years ago and became an ind pen dependent. i did so, because of the fact that on all of those issues, it just wasn't comfortable for me to be there anymore. but, you know, for me, as a live and let live kind of guy, as somebody who wants to be toll rant, who wants to be kind, the leadership doesn't seem to embrace that kind of view. so it became uncomfortable to me. the values that my mother and father raised me and m
. >> is our education system outdated? >> no. >> our union advocacy, is that outdated, how they go about fighting for it? i don't know. that question was put on the table. whether factories are shut, that means jobs have left. if you look at wages enjoyed by workers in right-to-work states, i think it should be put on the table. where do they fare? i have not done the analysis so it's hard to say. >> it's a question, though, willie, whether you want the job or not. >> right. >> i asked bob riley, i've said this 1,000 times, it seems extraordinarily important if you're a union member in the northeast, and like me, you want your factories running again. i asked bob riley, i don't understand, why did mercedes go to tuscaloosa county, alabama, instead of filling up the factories in connecticut? 15 minutes away from yale. or in rhode island. 20 minutes away from brown. i mean, right by some of the most highly trained, brilliant minds in the world. that's easy. the work force rules are so insane there, there's no way that mercedes or bmw or airbus would ever dream of going to those states. do
can't. >> you can't, you shouldn't. >> right. >> when you start slashing education, when you start slashing r&d, transportation -- >> it's over. >> -- what you're doing is, you're slashing about 3%, 4% of the budget. and you're leaving the parts of the budget that blow a hole in the deficit and destroy this economy over the next 20 years. >> by the way, we won't go over the cliff for all the reasons we're talking about. even if we do, my friends on the street tell me, it's not a disaster. it's baked in. because we're going to get it done even after the fact. so you're talking about a few points in the market. >>> we're just moments away, joe and i will be removing -- >> oh, no! there it is! >> ow! >> it's all for a great cause. >> i don't know if it's that good. >> i don't know. is this going to be good television or kind of yucky? okay. we'll be right back. americans are always ready to work hard for a better future. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never takin
the stimulus package to wealthy bankers. $50 billion went to education services of stimulus. $35 billion to increase education. there is $250 billion that went toward programs they represent. >> bob: i see. healthcare extension -- >> eric: point the finger at yourself. urination? urinating on poor people, that is disgusting, wrong, rude. they should be -- you know what? pull the funding. pull all of their funding. >> bob: they fund themselves. you want to pull the funding, pull the rich people from the i.r.s. >> greg: what i love about this, in the video or the cartoon they show a state declining in the poverty. it's not caused by the rich, because rich are leaving. >> dana: last week in forbes.com there was ten or 11 death spiral states. you don't want a house and can't get a job and ones saddled with the pension debt from the public sector unions. we had a big fight in wisconsin over this. what we were we dealing with at the start of school? chicago teachers union when school was starting. what happened to schoolhouse rock? those were video where you could learn something. >> greg: you
from budget cuts. florida hack looking to reform education in the state. your college major greatly affects how much money you make. according to the census data, engineering majors earn $3.5 million over a 40-year career, more than the median earnings for all majors, $2.4 million. those with education majors earn the least, $1.8 million. brooke? >>> bottom of the hour here, i'm brooke baldwin. thanks for being with me. you see the crowds, you see the president. he's speaking at redford, michigan, not too far from detroit. take a listen. >> so in addition to seeing the best workers in the world, you've got -- you've also got all this cool equipment. i want to try out some of the equipment. but secret service wouldn't let me. they said you're going to drop something on your head. hurt yourself. they were worried i would mess something up. and i -- they may not admit it, but i'm pretty sure they were happy the secret service wouldn't let me touch the equipment. now, it's been a little over a month since the election came to an end. [ applause ] so it's now safe for you to turn your te
get an ivy league education for free. but first this is "today" on nbc. >>> we're back at 8:46. what if you could take courses from prestigious universities like princeton, stanford, duke and others for free? well, you can. jamie gangel is in washington to explain how. good morning to you. >> good morning, savannah. truly a revelation in education. some of the elite universities are offering these classes, let's say it again, for free. and they are attracting millions of students, include iing a cou who might surprise you. from finance to calculus to poetry. >> let's go to a second passage. >> reporter: world class professors are now offering their courses absolutely free. want to discover your inner passion for emily dickinson? >> her work is done in the realm of possibility. >> reporter: all you need is a computer and internet access. classes are known as massive open online courses or mooc. offered by several start-up companies, the largest and fastest growing is called coursera, the brainchild of these two professors. their goal is to revolutionize education. >> giving us the opp
with educations, people with brains and a knowledge of american history, who come out and argue that this is something that should be put on the table. >> yeah. i guess brains and an education but still somehow profoundly ignorant, and they're emblematic of if not the ignorant people in the republican people, at least people who will pander to that ignorance. it's apiece of birtherism, the climate change is a hoax, if you cut taxes for rich people, magically the economy revives. it's magical thinking, and we're in the thrall of magical thinkers. the republican party has to follow their magical thinkers. because they do, the rest of the national conversation gets distorted and pulled way over to the right. that's what's happening. >> ron, i love the way you suggest that the real patriots are the ones who want to secede from the united states. it reminds me -- we once had a priest named father feeney. he didn't like the church's view because the church didn't support no salvation outside the church. so he leaves the church. that's just like -- wait a minute, you're one of them now
owned by the career education corporation, one of the major league for-profit colleges. his parents didn't have the means to pay for his education but helped him out by cosigning the loans. now the student and the parents have $103,000 in student loan debt. one of the loans has a 13% interest rate, and the balance continues to rise. this young man, young man would like to finish his degree but he can't afford to. he can't borrow any more money. he is too deeply in debt. how about that for a dilemma? $103,000 in debt, no degree. he can't borrow the money to get a degree. many of these students find out these for-profit courses they took are worthless. they don't transfer anywhere. the diplomacy themselves turn out to be worthless and many employers just laugh at them. you would never know that from the advertising these for-profit schools engage in. i had a group of students in my office this morning. they were from archbishop carroll high school, not too far from the capitol here. they are students who know a little bit about being wooed and enticed by colleges, universities. we talked a
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know this better than i do, whether it's immigration, education, voter suppression, what the leadership of the party has done is say on immigration, you know, you got -- we want deportation. when it talks about education, it's talking about not funding it anymore. when they talk about voter suppression, they deny people the right to vote in a civil manner -- >> but you grew up in this party. it has been a party tough on immigration before, hasn't it? hasn't it been a party on a number of the issues you mentioned before? before recently. when is the big -- when do you think the republican party in your terms broke bad? when did it start to be a party you couldn't be comfortably a member of anymore as governor or as a political person at all? >> i think it started several years ago, maybe three, two, three years ago. i left the party two years ago and became an independent. and i did so because of the fact that, you know, on all of those issues it just wasn't comfortable for me to be there anymore. i mean, you know, everybody has the right to be a member of whatever party they want and i
are education and training. and then sometimes they're talking about skill gaps where there's just not a strong enough connection between how we do worker training and the skills that are actually opened in particular areas. and all three of those are important skill gap were still issues, but they did not take with them the exact same policy solutions. and as we move forward, places like cap and others can help all of us by helping to define these issues and defined which policies address them. and i would suggest would be strongest when we have a larger skills compact. i think, many people come to silicon valley to silicon valley of talk is about the need for high skills immigration. and i agree. i think we do need to do more on -- the president agrees, but not just of a larger copperheads of immigration strategy, but one component of a larger skills strategy which also talks about how we can increase the number of skilled workers coming from our country, from u.s. schools, from u.s. work force. together, that is a skills compact i think the country could easily get behind and support. so i t
. years or 22 years old. i have spent of this entire year try to educate myself a lot more on the whole -- let me get right to the point. i think it should be a state decision. the supreme court should allow the states to make the kind of a decision. giving more people -- in giving more power to the government to regulate this on a national level will create so many issues down the road, and it probably a lot of issues in the immediate -- the reason we even got to this. is because we get some much power to the government to regulate all of the different things and issues. giving them more power is just going to create more problems. my basic thought is, more government power, more issues. host: we will leave it there. victor on the republican line. caller: i do not think the supreme court should even hear the case on gay marriage. our country was built on marriage. it is an abomination to rid it should not even be brought up again to the supreme court. host: why not let them handle it since courts have weighed in on a in california? caller: california is already full of abomination as i
' including closing the educational achievement gap. the lofty goals may have to wait as lawmakers and the president toppled a number of issues that cannot wait. let's go back to the inauguration from generic 20, 2009, a few hundred feet from where we are at as he addressed the nation. he will do so again january next year. this is what he said nearly four years ago. [video clip] >> we must dust ourselves off and begin the work of remaking america. [applause] everywhere we look, there is work to be done. the state of our economy calls for action bold and swift. we will react to lay a new foundation for growth. electrical grids that bind us together. we will restore science to its rightful place and raise health care quality and lower cost. we will harness the sun and the wind to run our factories and will transform our schools and colleges to meet the demands of a new age. all of this we can do. all of this we will do. there are some who question the scale of our ambitions to suggest our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. their memories are short. they have forgotten what t
was educate latino voters, educationing them on how to vote and how to vote in arizona because we have a mail-in ballot process and a voter i.d. law in place so a lot of organizations were educate latino voters, it may be easier to sign up on the mail-in list so you don't have to deal with identification if you don't have the proper i.d. and choose to vote in person. i think that explains why there were so many mail-in ballots cast in the general election in 2012. >> i want to get back to the senate race but stick with the voter i.d. requirements. talk about the restrictions, what exactly the requirements are, and in particular there's been this discussion at the national level about republicans are using voter i.d. requirements to tamp down on voter turnout from certain areas. what are the concerns? how is the latino population-latino voters in arizona -- how are they dealing with that? are there problems? is there going to be a battle over trying to tight 'the voter i.d. requirements? is it a photo i.d. requirement? >> really quickly. arizona's voter i.d. law was put -- voted on by the citi
talk about education, they defund it. talk about voter suppression, they deny voting to people, and i just can't embrace that anymore and be true to myself. >> let me read some of your own quotes back to you. hard to be more conservative than i am on the issues. back on 2009. pro life, pro gun, pro family, i'm anti tax. have you changed on those four specific things? >> no, i'm not saying that at all. i'm pro life, but i don't believe in imposing my will on other people. i believe people should support and protect the second amendment. i believe raising taxes isn't something anybody wants to do. certainly i never wanted to do it as a legislator or as governor. i believe in public safety. i believe in protecting the environment. i live in florida, the most beautiful state in the country in my humble opinion. these things i have always believed in. education, ethics, the environment, protecting the economy, and fighting for people. >> let's focus on taxes for a moment. in the fiscal cliff debate, tax is a big part of that. where do you stand on that if you are anti tax? >> anti tax, but
schoolteacher who spent the better part of 40 years educating our children. she deserves and needs to e retire next year. she's 64. i'm here for darlene, a -- [inaudible] native who receives her life saving blood pressure medication through medicare part d. i'm here for alice, an african-american grandmother of ten who receives treatment for her diabetes through medicaid. this woman worked her whole life in the hotel industry. i'm here for my friend mark who owns a small business. he's a construction manager. >> ma'am, ma'am, i'm going to ask you to sit down so we can have this discussion. >> i'm happy to leave -- [inaudible] >> out! [inaudible conversations] >> out! [inaudible conversations] >> we're gonna vote -- [inaudible] the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! we're gonna vote, not float the economy! >> okay. i'm gonna take a moment to try to, um, talk, and we'll see if it works. i don't know if other people are here. but i actually think that what we just saw is, um, a true reflection of how hard what we're trying to do is. i'm real
product coming up? >> i think education is coming up. there is too much regulation and areas we can't touch with unions and bureaucracy. especially college education. college education going online will be big in the next five years. >> do you have investments in that? >> the have an investment in the guy who did the google car doing online education, a stanford professor and decided online education is next and google didn't want to do it and we're backing him and it will be fun to see. >> marc andreessen, thank you for being here. send it back to the studios. >> this is embarrassing. she is like throwing herself at the camera. i've never seen this side of you. >> there's so few voices willing to say what he said out loud. >> andrew, we asked him to guest host. he can talk the disrupter stuff and politics. >> he's the ultimate disrupter. >> another guy came out. will you do that? >> marc? >> we will have him come out. he's on his way back. >> becky will be back by then so you don't have to worry about me. >> right. exactly. got it. >> she'll leave the ring. >> need some muscle to k
is education, and how to make higher education cheaper. how to reform programs. what would be the number one thing that you would do that you can do as a freshman minority senator? >> well, i don't think there's a number one thing, but a number of number one things, and we have to do them all. as a 21st century student, doesn't look like it. it's not just an 18-year-old that graduated high school. that still continues to be a significant part of the folks that are going into college, but it's also the 38-year-old who decided to go back to school to get a degree. that was my sister's experience. it's also the 25-year-old after ten years after being out of high school is stuck in service jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves with new skills. the great news is that technology advances are going to not only lower the time and cost of getting that kind of skill acquisition, but will make it, you know, much more accessible, and with we have to ensure our student aid programs are not in the way of it. right now, we have a student aid program, the pelle grants or the loan programs, they
, gosh. i would lean towards jeb at this piont because he has really been pushing education. right now, he's got me. host: stephen, who did you vote for in 2008? in 2012.ean caller: i voted for president obama. i really liked mitt romney. why do i have to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? that really bugged me. host: that is stephen from connecticut. tyrone is a republican from the bronx. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate in 2016. i think she handled the middle eastern issue to the best of her ability. also, as far as the gop is concerned, i think she has made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with private entities and organizations that are coming out of the woodwork. i was watching earlier today and what they were requesting from the white house was let's fix this problem by incorporating a small businesses and less government intervention to curb the deficit. it has been astronomical. then i heard barack obama say the way we are going to do it is by making more cuts in various ways. he was saying by
versus virginia. employment discrimination, 13 years after brown versus board of education. the supreme court had a marriage case on its bokt in 1956. but kicked it. because it didn't want to touch it with a ten-foot pole so waited for more states to come around. it's also the year that guess who's coming to dinner comes out. there's a cultural legal convergence. we're at that moment for the gay community now. one of the historians in the gay marriage trial, nancy kauts, a historian of marriage, she said one of the emancipated slaves after -- the slaves flocked to get married. she testified that one of the emancipated slaves said the marriage covenant is a foundation of all of our rights. so i totally agree with rea that this is just the beginning but it is an important cornerstone to building full equality for lgbt citizens. >> this question of sort of how enslaved people thought about marriage, the extent to which they engaged in formal marriages and then the extent to which ones given the freedom it became one of the first things that free people did to represent their freedom is ins
and pretend -- not these guys but someone else from the radio station. they're from the board of education and said there was a mistake and she did badly. they had one girl on and put her on a lie detector 14 years old and asked about her sex life. she gets raem upset and turns out she was raped at 12. this sort of thing, object seven at this times and they had a porn star on one sometime. another one is carl sanderson, controversial on the radio station. a female journalist wrote a negative story about her, and et cetera esd he was going to get her. >> what happens to the radio station and these two deejays? is there an investigation? >> scotland yard in britain is investigating, and they've spoken to australian police to pull together their investigation. we expect the coroner's court decision to come out or the coroner to make a statement today, actually. the company -- we have a comment from the company. they say first and foremost we'd like to express our deep and sincere con dolenesss to the family for the lost and we're sorry for what happened. we don't claim to be perfect and we al
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